Deployments with containers

This post is part of The Containerization Chronicles, a series of posts about Containerization. In them, I write about my experiments and what I’ve learned on Containerization of applications. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

Now that we have the project integrated with a Continuous Integration server, where we run the tests and report back to GitHub pull requests with the results of the test run and the coverage, we can deploy our project and make it available on the Internet.

We will do so with Heroku. I have chosen Heroku because it allows me to perform these experiments for free.

If you want to jump into the code, this is the tag for this post.

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Continuous Integration with containers

This post is part of The Containerization Chronicles, a series of posts about Containerization. In them, I write about my experiments and what I’ve learned on Containerization of applications. The contents of this post might make more sense if you read the previous posts in this series.

Now that we have some containers in place for development, we can integrate with a CI server. I chose Scrutinizer CI because of the code analysis it makes, the fact that it is also a CI server it’s a plus. However, as a CI, it has some limitations, which I will talk about later on when integrating with Heroku, so we will most likely move to another CI engine later in the future while keeping Scrutinizer only for the code analysis but, for now, this is all we need.

To set up the CI, we will:

  1. Containerize an environment to run the tests in the CI
  2. Configure Scrutinizer
  3. Add the scrutinizer badges to the README.md
  4. Integrate Scrutinizer with GitHub

If you want to jump right into the code, this is the tag on GitHub.

Continue reading here